The Truth Behind Bawang Shampoo: Cancer Concerns And Consumer Safety

does bawang shampoo cause cancer

In 2010, a Hong Kong-based magazine reported that Bawang Chinese Herbal Essence Shampoo Series, Bawang Hair Darkening Shampoo, and Royal Wind Shampoo, produced by B&W International Group, contained the cancer-causing substance 1,4-dioxane. This claim was backed by test results from a Swiss inspection company. The manufacturer denied the allegation, stating that the levels of dioxane in their products were well below the safety limit and that their products were manufactured in accordance with the laws of China and met the safety requirements of Hong Kong and the mainland. The controversy caused a slump in Bawang's share prices, and the company sued the magazine for libel, asking for over HKD 630 million in damages.

Characteristics Values
Cancer Risk Contains 1,4-Dioxane, a chemical classified as a probable carcinogen by the US Department of Health and Human Services and the International Agency for Research on Cancer
Company Response Bawang denied the products pose any danger to users, stating that the concentration of Dioxane is far below the safety limit
Regulatory Compliance Bawang claimed its products met the safety requirements of Hong Kong, China, the US, and the European Union
Endorsements Kung fu movie star Jackie Chan endorsed the product in TV commercials
Share Price Impact Bawang's share price dropped by up to 18% following the cancer claims

shunhair

Bawang shampoo contains 1,4-dioxane, a chemical that is classified as a probable carcinogen

Bawang shampoo, a popular hair product endorsed by kung fu movie star Jackie Chan, has been at the centre of a controversy regarding its safety. The shampoo was found to contain 1,4-dioxane, a chemical that is classified as a probable carcinogen by the US Department of Health and Human Services. This discovery led to a public outcry and resulted in Bawang's stocks being suspended from trading in Hong Kong, as well as a significant drop in their share price.

In response to the allegations, Bawang issued a statement defending the safety of their products. They asserted that their shampoos had undergone stringent quality tests and met the safety standards required by mainland China and Hong Kong authorities. The company also claimed that the levels of 1,4-dioxane in their products were far below the safety limit and posed no risk to human health. Bawang even went as far as to sue Next Magazine, the publication that broke the story, for libel and defamation, seeking significant damages.

The presence of 1,4-dioxane in Bawang shampoo is particularly concerning due to the chemical's ability to penetrate the skin. It is often found in products that create suds, such as shampoo and liquid soap, as it is created when certain common ingredients are mixed together. This makes it difficult for consumers to avoid exposure, especially since it is not required to be listed as an ingredient on product labels.

1,4-dioxane is not only a probable carcinogen but is also linked to organ toxicity. It has been shown to irritate the eyes and respiratory tract and is suspected of causing damage to the central nervous system, the liver, and the kidneys. The potential health risks associated with this chemical are serious, and it is important for consumers to be aware of the presence of such harmful substances in the products they use.

shunhair

The manufacturer, B&W International Group, denied that their products pose any health risks

B&W International Group maintained that the concentration of dioxane in their products is significantly below the safety limit and would not cause any adverse effects on human health. The company refuted the allegations made by the Hong Kong-based magazine, Next Magazine, accusing them of inaccurate and exaggerated reporting. B&W even threatened legal action against the publication, demanding over HKD630 million in damages.

The company's spokesperson, kung fu movie star Jackie Chan, also defended the shampoo, stating that he initially turned down the endorsement but was pleased to discover that the products use herbs instead of chemicals. Chan's involvement added to the controversy, with some suggesting that his reputation may have been impacted. However, marketing experts predicted that Chan's credibility would remain intact, given his established reputation in the Chinese market.

B&W International Group's response to the allegations caused a temporary stir in the market, with their share price dropping by 14.116% and trading being suspended on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Despite the initial fallout, the company maintained its stance on product safety and sought to reassure consumers and investors.

shunhair

Bawang claimed that their products are manufactured in accordance with the laws of China and meet safety requirements

Bawang, a Chinese herbal shampoo manufacturer, has been at the centre of a controversy regarding the safety of its products. The company, endorsed by kung fu movie star Jackie Chan, was accused by a Hong Kong-based magazine of using a cancer-causing chemical, dioxane, in its shampoos. This claim caused Bawang's shares to plummet, and the company responded by strongly denying the allegations, stating that their products are manufactured in accordance with Chinese laws and meet the safety requirements of both Hong Kong and mainland China.

Bawang issued a statement saying that the magazine had exaggerated the issue and accused it of inaccurate reporting. They asserted that the concentration of dioxane in their products was well below the safety limit and would not impact human health. The company even reserved the right to take legal action against the magazine.

Bawang's statement aligns with its initial response to the allegations, where they emphasised that their products had undergone stringent quality tests and met the required standards. They also mentioned that their products complied with US and European Union safety requirements, further reinforcing their commitment to product safety.

It is important to note that Bawang is not the only company that uses dioxane in its products. The chemical is commonly found in shampoos and other cosmetic items as it is a byproduct of the raw materials used in manufacturing. However, this incident has brought attention to the potential risks associated with exposure to this chemical.

While Bawang maintains that its products are safe, the controversy has sparked concerns among consumers and highlights the importance of stringent quality control and transparency in the manufacturing industry, especially when it comes to products that people use daily, such as shampoo.

5 Places to Purchase Renpure Dry Shampoo

You may want to see also

shunhair

Jackie Chan, the celebrity endorser of Bawang, faced criticism for his association with the brand

Chan, a well-known film star in China and around the world, has been a popular spokesman for mainland brands for years, endorsing a wide range of products. However, his association with Bawang drew criticism as it was not the first time a company he endorsed faced controversy. In 2011, food brand Synear, which Chan promoted, was ordered to pull one of its products off the shelves due to the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. Additionally, Japanese car company Mitsubishi, which Chan had represented in China for years, recalled more than 23,000 vehicles in response to safety concerns about its airbag inflators.

Chan's response to the Bawang controversy further fueled the criticism he faced. Instead of addressing the concerns directly, Chan implied that someone was trying to harm him and Bawang, stating, "Incidents like this, where shampoos are reported to have problems, are not new... I have always been very careful with what products I endorse." Some commentators viewed this response as an attempt to deflect blame and shift the focus away from the issue at hand.

The Bawang controversy also brought attention to Chan's shifting political views, which had gradually moved from a pro-democratic stance in the 1990s to a pro-Beijing stance since the 2010s. Chan's outspoken support for China's ruling Communist Party had already caused controversy in Hong Kong, with many accusing him of parroting the government's stances. His comments questioning the value of freedom and praising Beijing's air quality were particularly unpopular, leading to accusations of shilling for the government. As a result, Chan became a divisive figure, with some calling for a boycott of his films and others defending his right to choose his political stance.

Overall, Jackie Chan's association with Bawang and his response to the controversy added to the criticism he was already facing for his political views and other controversies. The situation highlighted the potential risks for companies and celebrities when product safety and endorsement deals come into question.

shunhair

Bawang sued Next Magazine for libel, seeking damages of over HKD630 million

Bawang sued Next Magazine for libel, seeking damages of over HK$630 million. The lawsuit was filed over the magazine's report that Bawang's shampoos, endorsed by Jackie Chan, contained 1,4-dioxane, a cancer-causing chemical. The article, published on July 14, 2010, specifically mentioned the Bawang Chinese Herbal Essence Shampoo Series, Bawang Hair Darkening Shampoo, and Royal Wind Shampoo.

Bawang claimed that the article led to a significant slump in its share price and business losses. The company argued that there was insufficient evidence to prove that 1,4-dioxane is carcinogenic, and that the levels of the chemical in their products were safe. They also emphasised that their shampoos met the safety requirements of Hong Kong and mainland China, as well as international standards.

The trial gained attention due to the involvement of Jackie Chan, who faced public scrutiny for his endorsement of the potentially harmful products. During the trial, a lawyer for Bawang claimed that their product was "safer than drinking water".

The High Court found Next Magazine guilty of defamation, stating that the magazine had failed to establish the truthfulness of its content and had not met the standards of responsible journalism. However, the court did not find any malicious intent behind the article and reduced the damages awarded to Bawang to HK$3 million. The court considered the importance of freedom of expression in its decision-making.

This case highlights the potential consequences of publishing unverified claims and the need for responsible and accurate reporting, especially when it comes to sensitive issues like public health and safety.

Frequently asked questions

Bawang shampoo was found to contain the cancer-causing substance 1,4-Dioxane, which is classified by the US Department of Health and Human Services as a probable carcinogen. The company, however, denied that its herb-infused products pose any danger to users.

Bawang International sued Next Magazine for libel, claiming that the article alleging their shampoos could cause cancer led to a 20% slump in its share price. The company is asking for more than HKD630 million in damages.

Jackie Chan defended himself and the company, saying, "Incidents like this, where shampoos are reported to have problems, are not new. Someone is trying to harm me and BaWang. I have always been very careful with what products I endorse."

Written by
Reviewed by
Share this post
Print
Did this article help you?

Leave a comment